Diamond Partner
Music legend and former Beatles member, Sir Paul McCartney has requested Indian Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Bhupender Yadav to take urgent action to send abused elephant, Jeymalyatha (also known as Joymala) to a suitable rescue centre.
There are quite a few landmark judgments which, while not resulting in the expected social transformation, have made a beginning simply by acknowledging the wrong
The latest Outlook edition titled Women-in-law takes stock of significant rulings and legislations in recent times that specifically deal with women’s rights in the country.
Progressive verdicts by courts help the cause of gender justice. But a lot remains to be done. Despite laws like protection of women from domestic violence act, 2005, Indian women continue to suffer violence in a patriarchal society, claim activists and experts
Why does our legal morality treat marriage between two people as some social welfare institution in whose continuance society at large has a stake?
Despite there being a multitude of alimony and maintenance laws, women are left empty-handed and struggle to make ends meet after a bad marriage, as experts feel that these laws do not give any cover for the women
Updated: 12 Sep 2022 10:12 am
Music legend and former Beatles member, Sir Paul McCartney has requested Indian Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Bhupender Yadav to take urgent action to send abused elephant, Jeymalyatha (also known as Joymala) to a suitable rescue centre.

The letter from the global music legend came in support of the plea by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) India, and after two videos of the elephant screaming in pain while being beaten by separate mahouts went viral.

In the letter, McCartney said: "I have considered India a spiritual place ever since I travelled there in 1960s. I was impressed by India's cultural love for animals. I know India reveres elephants, its national heritage animal, but cruelty to animals happens everywhere, even in India."

"What reflects on a country's values is how the cruelty is addressed . That's why I am confident that action will be taken to send sorely abused elephant Jeymalyatha (Joymala) to a suitable rescue centre where she can receive the specialised care she needs for her psychological wounds, and can live unchained and in the company of others of her kind."

PETA India had recently submitted a veterinary inspection report on Jeymalyatha's condition conducted on 27 July to Forest Department officials in Tamil Nadu and Assam.

The report points out that Jeymalyatha's current mahout uses pliers on her skin even in front of inspectors. PETA, in its report, noted that the mahout forbade the inspectors from taking still photographs and video footage but they still documented the condition of the elephant.

The inspection, it may be noted was conducted after two separate viral videos emerged, one in June 2022 and the other in February 2021, of Jeymalyatha being beaten by different mahouts and screaming in pain.
Diamond Partner:
Subscribe to get complete access to Outlook Print and Digital Magazines, Web Exclusive stories and the Archive. Attractive gifts with each subscription.
© 2022 Outlook Publishing India Pvt. Ltd

source

Shop Sephari